Natural Emergency Treatments Every Prepper Should Know

We live in a world where so-called modern wonder drugs, laboratories, and equipment have obscured more “primitive” yet highly effective types of medicine involving determination, common sense, and a few simple treatments.

Natural Emergency Treatments

This is something you need to always keep in mind when thinking about First Aid in survival situations. A well-stocked First Aid kit can only take you so far, and only last you so long.

When lost in the wilderness, or in the aftermath of a natural disaster where you could be cut off for days, months, years, or forever, for that matter — from the corner drugstore, let me remind you that I have been in combat in many parts of the world where people still depend on local Shamans or healers to cure their ailments.

Many of the herbal and botanical based treatments they use are as effective as the most “modern” drugs available. In fact, many modern pharmaceuticals you take for granted, owe their origins to the herbs and plants found in the rainforests. Here are several “natural” first aid treatments you need to get to know.

Natural Emergency Treatments Every Prepper Should Know

Antihaemorrhagecs for bleeding.

 You can make medications to stop bleeding from plantain leaves, or, most effectively, from the leaves of the common yarrow or woundwort (Achillea millefolium). These mostly give a physical barrier to the bleeding. Prickly pear (the raw, peeled part) or witch hazel can be applied to wounds. Both are good for their astringent properties (they shrink blood vessels).

For bleeding gums or mouth sores, sweet gum can be chewed or used as a toothpick. This provides some chemical and antiseptic properties as well.

Antiseptics to clean infections.

Use antiseptics to cleanse wounds, snakebites, sores, or rashes. You can make antiseptics from the expressed juice of wild onion or garlic, the expressed juice from chickweed leaves, or the crushed leaves of dock.

You can also make antiseptics by boiling burdock root, mallow leaves or roots, or white oak bark (tannic acid). Prickly pear, slippery elm, yarrow, and sweet gum are all good antiseptics as well. All these medications are for external use only. Two of the best antiseptics are sugar and honey. Sugar should be applied to the wound until it becomes syrupy, then washed off and reapplied. Honey should be applied three times daily. Honey is by far the best of the antiseptics for open wounds and burns, with sugar being second.

RELATED: A MEDICINAL PLANT MAP THAT SHOULD BE IN YOUR SURVIVAL KIT

OFF GRID ANTIBIOTICS – FOR WHEN THERE IS NO MEDICINE

Analgesics for aches, pains, and sprains.

Treat these conditions by making a warm compress of the crushed leaves of dock, plantain, chickweed, willow bark, garlic, or sorrel. Sweet gum has some analgesic (pain relief) properties. Chewing the willow bark or making a tea from it is the best for pain relief as it contains salicylic acid, the raw component of aspirin. You can also use salves made by mixing the expressed juices of these plants in animal fat or vegetable oils. To obtain the most powerful natural pain killer you have to make wild lettuce extract. Here’s a video on how to do it:

Insect Bites and Stings

You can relieve the itching and discomfort caused by insect bites in the field by applying:

  • Cold compresses
  • A cooling paste of mud and ashes
  • Sap from dandelions
  • Coconut meat
  • Crushed cloves of garlic
  • Onion

RELATED: 6 POTENT NATURAL PAIN RELIEVERS FOR PREPPERS

Tips and Takeaways

Here are a few other tricks of the trade.

  • You can treat diarrhea by drinking a tea from the roots of blackberries. Tea made from cowberry, cranberry, or hazel leaves works too.
  • You can reduce fever with a tea made from willow bark, elder berries, linden flower, or aspen or slippery elm bark.
  • Tea made from mint leaves or passionflower leaves, has a sedative effect, it can help you, (or you kids) get some sleep in a tense survival situation.

I told you the basics you need in a First Aid Kit – but if one thing that pre-packaged kits never seem to have enough of is bandages. Remember the very idea of “first” aid is to just stabilize a person until you can get them to advanced medical treatment. That may not be for a long time in a survival situation, so you should have extra bandages.

Since space is always an issue, I recommend you get some hospital grade or mil. spec. trauma bandages, like BloodStopper, or TrauMedic, that can be boiled and reused if you have too.

I always have a few feminine sanitary “maxi pads” in my kit. They can be used as highly absorbent compresses for dealing with bleeding or seeping wounds. Avoid the kind that are scented, or “deodorizing.”

I have given you some tips that can help you survive injury or emergencies in the field, but getting yourself some real First Aid Training can be as important to your survival as learning Self Defense or spending time on a gun range.

If you found this article useful, please like our facebook page and stay up to date with the latest articles.

Remember, ‘’By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail’’ – Benjamin Franklin

Stay safe,

James

Would you like to know how the first settlers healed themselves and what plants they used to cure everything?

Then you really need this amazing book. It is called The Lost Ways and it contains all the knowledge of our forefathers.

Here’s just a glimpse of what you’ll find in The Lost Ways:

From Ruff Simons, an old west history expert and former deputy, you’ll learn the techniques and methods used by the wise sheriffs from the frontiers to defend an entire village despite being outnumbered and outgunned by gangs of robbers and bandits, and how you can use their wisdom to defend your home against looters when you’ll be surrounded.

Native American ERIK BAINBRIDGE – who took part in the reconstruction of the native village of Kule Loklo in California, will show you how Native Americans build the subterranean roundhouse, an underground house that today will serve you as a storm shelter, a perfectly camouflaged hideout, or a bunker. It can easily shelter three to four families, so how will you feel if, when all hell breaks loose, you’ll be able to call all your loved ones and offer them guidance and shelter? Besides that, the subterranean roundhouse makes an awesome root cellar where you can keep all your food and water reserves year-round.

From Shannon Azares you’ll learn how sailors from the XVII century preserved water in their ships for months on end, even years and how you can use this method to preserve clean water for your family cost-free.

Mike Searson – who is a Firearm and Old West history expert – will show you what to do when there is no more ammo to be had, how people who wandered the West managed to hunt eight deer with six bullets, and why their supply of ammo never ran out. Remember the panic buying in the first half of 2013? That was nothing compared to what’s going to precede the collapse.

From Susan Morrow, an ex-science teacher and chemist, you’ll master “The Art of Poultice.” She says, “If you really explore the ingredients from which our forefathers made poultices, you’ll be totally surprised by the similarities with modern medicines.” Well…how would you feel in a crisis to be the only one from the group knowledgeable about this lost skill? When there are no more antibiotics, people will turn to you to save their ill children’s lives.

And believe it or not, this is not all…

Table Of Contents:
Making Your Own Beverages: Beer to Stronger Stuff
Ginger Beer: Making Soda the Old Fashioned Way
How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican
Spycraft: Military Correspondence During The 1700’s to 1900’s
Wild West Guns for SHTF and a Guide to Rolling Your Own Ammo
How Our Forefathers Built Their Sawmills, Grain Mills,and Stamping Mills
How Our Ancestors Made Herbal Poultice to Heal Their Wounds
What Our Ancestors Were Foraging For? or How to Wildcraft Your Table
How Our Ancestors Navigated Without Using a GPS System
How Our Forefathers Made Knives
How Our Forefathers Made Snow shoes for Survival
How North California Native Americans Built Their Semi-subterranean Roundhouses
Our Ancestors’Guide to Root Cellars
Good Old Fashioned Cooking on an Open Flame
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Preserve Water
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Take Care of Our Hygiene When There Isn’t Anything to Buy
How and Why I Prefer to Make Soap with Modern Ingredients
Temporarily Installing a Wood-Burning Stove during Emergencies
Making Traditional and Survival Bark Bread…….
Trapping in Winter for Beaver and Muskrat Just like Our Forefathers Did
How to Make a Smokehouse and Smoke Fish
Survival Lessons From The Donner Party

Get your paperback copy HERE

WHAT TO READ NEXT:
5 TECHNIQUES TO PRESERVE MEAT IN THE WILD YOU SHOULD PRACTICE
HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BACON (STEP BY STEP GUIDE)
A RETURN TO THE OLD PATHS: HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN LIKE THE NATIVE AMERICANS
20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED ON THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD
SEVEN CLASSIC GREAT DEPRESSION ERA RECIPES GRANDMA USED TO MAKE
POTTED MEAT: A LOST SKILL OF LONG TERM MEAT STORAGE
BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD
THE BEST WAY TO STOCKPILE VEGETABLES OFF-GRID
OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM
HOW TO MAKE GUNPOWDER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY
SURVIVAL HERBAL RECIPES FROM OUR ANCESTORS
HOW TO PRESERVE MEAT FOR SURVIVAL LIKE OUR GRANDFATHERS

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

The 3 Pioneer Survival Lessons We Should Learn

The Most Effective Home Defense Strategies

Old School Hacks for Off-Grid Living

The Medical Emergency Crash Course

The Smart, Easy Way to Food Independence

How to Survive the Coming 100 Years Long Drought

Add Comment

Required fields are marked *. Your email address will not be published.